Yellowhammer with a ring on Billinge hill on Thursday. Theyre on the red list but must be one of the commonest birds around the hill area!

7 comments :

  1. I photographed this bird again on the hill yesterday and can see some of the ring details! Is there anyway I can post it to find out where it was ringed? Im guessing it would have been Fir Tree farm because a bird ringing group put up nets on some sundays to carry out their work! The details I can see are MUS (top line), ON S (middle line) and 637 (bottom line) !

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  2. http://two-in-a-bush.blogspot.co.uk/ this guy has been ringing in the area and likelihood its one of his, email me and I'll give you his details.

    Paul B

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  3. Don't think I have your e mail?

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  4. Here is the reply from Peter
    "Hi Paul,
    I won't be able to pin that Yellowhammer down but it was almost certainly ringed up there. Unfortunately 637 are the first 3 numbers of ring sequence TP63701 to TP637800 (100 rings) and 65 of those were used on Yellowhammers on the hill. It is still good that people are interested and sometimes you can narrow it down from part of a ring number. If he had got one more number after the 7 I could have narrowed it down to 10 or less birds."

    Paul B

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  5. Thanks, i'll try and catch it and get a closer look!:)

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  6. Im was wondering though, why ring birds like yellowhammers? Surely they aren't birds that fly very far from the area theyve fledged from? And im assuming their lifespans are roughly the same? So what else can be learned from ringing them?

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  7. Hi Andrew,
    Apart from cool stuff like age, sex, condition, weight, size etc finding out about even local movements can be vital in securing the future of red-listed birds such as these. The lack of info on certain birds and their ecology is at time frightening!

    Paul B

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